Malcolm Danare: “Christine”

The following screenshot is from a famous scene from one of the 80’s greatest horror films, Christine.

Malcolm Danare (aka early 80’s Jonah Hill) plays the unfortunate victim of a possessed 1958 Plymouth Fury.

“Christine” was one of my early introduction to horror films (“Alien” being my all-time favorite); and it made such an impact on me that I became a horror fan.  John Carpenter actually made killing people, well, “cool” to my impressionable mind.  I’m talking about early Carpenter stuff such as “Halloween,” “Halloween II,” and “The Thing.”  With “Christine,” he has perfected a symphony of death by blending haunting synthesized music with classic 50’s songs.

If you haven’t seen the film, I highly recommend it.  Obviously, this is a semi-spoiler, but this is the scene called “The Death Of Moochie Welch”…

The following are screenshots of Mr. Danare who also gave me a good reason to keep watching this movie on Betamax, over and over, back in the day.

4 thoughts on “Malcolm Danare: “Christine” Leave a comment

  1. Normally, the movies I loved as a kid turn out to be not-so-good when I view it through my older eyes. Perfect examples would be “Zapped!” (“greatest comedy ever!”) and “The Neverending Story”/”The Goonies”/”The Dark Crystal” (“greatest kid fantasy adventures ever!”).

    Then there are those timeless films that would always be true classics: “The Princess Bride,” “Gremlins,” and, yes, “Christine.” I personally feel that “Christine” is one of the greatest “horror films” simply because we had real characters to sympathize and root for. I’m not talking about the stereotypic “evil” high school victims, but more about Cunningham and Dennis and the dynamics of their friendship.

    And the horror of the film is as relevant today as ever. Themes of “Road Rage” and “revenge” — especially revenge and violence practiced by, otherwise, normally “meek” individuals — are present in the film. There’s also a subversive “revenge fantasy” fetish that’s prevalent in the film. Not only that, there’s also a “techno-Equus”-like horse-lust that shows up between Cunningham’s fixation towards his car. As our society gets more technologically-savvy, our reliance and even love for machines may actually become a possibility.

    I can ramble on and on about this and you could come back with “Well, that’s all good, but the move is still teh sux,” but all I can say is that the drama and horror of the film still speaks to me and it does disturb me when I watch it to this very day.

    Plus, like I said, the kills were just too freaking cool.

  2. To each his own, I guess.

    Christine wouldn’t even make my top 50 horror movies of the 80’s. Just considering Stephen King books made into movies, I’d place The Shining and The Dead Zone way ahead on the list.

  3. I just gotta say one thing. Foo, don’t insult Christine, because when it comes to horror movies, it doesn’t have to be scary to be a good movie. With Christine, it’s her good looks that made it a movie worth watching. She’s the most beautiful car ever to be in a movie. I’m just saying, even though you posted your comment a while ago, hopefully your attitude has changed for the better. For all you Christine fans out there, ROCK ON!

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